Notes on a Transcendental Argument from Logic

Nearly ever since I was first exposed to transcendental argumentation through listening to that famous debate between Greg Bahnsen and Gordon Stein,1 I have retained the intuition that there is an interesting potential argument from the fact that there are necessary propositions (necessary, that is, simpliciter) to the conclusion that there is a necessary mind. While the analysis of what it means to be a necessary mind will fall short of the God of perfect being theology or classical theism, it will still provide a being which so resembles God that it significantly undermines atheism. This being may not have all the superlative attributes, but it will be a metaphysically necessary immaterial spaceless timeless being with an intellect (and whatever that entails), et hoc omnes intelligunt Deum. However, to avoid the charge of using St. Thomas’ famous phrase in order to paper-over the chasm between my conclusion and full-blown theism, I will state the conclusion more modestly in terms of which the good old reverend Bayes would approve. Enjoy;

1) There are laws of logic.
2) Logical laws are identical to necessary propositions (exempli gratia [P v ~P])
3) Therefore, there are necessary propositions.
4) Propositions are not real entities which exist mind-independently, but are mind-dependent (i.e., there is no proposition for which there is not at least one subvenient mind).
5) A necessary truth is a truth which obtains in all logically possible worlds.
6) Necessary truths are either grounded in at least one contingent mind, or at least one incontingent mind.
7) There are logically possible worlds without any contingent minds.
8) Therefore, there must be at least one necessary mind.
9) If there is at least one necessary mind then it is a being with intellect (plausibly knowing all necessary truths), which is immaterial (spaceless, timeless) in nature.
10) The conditional probability of theism is, ceteris paribus, greater than the conditional probability of not-theism on the condition that there is at least one metaphysically necessary immaterial being with intellect. 
11) Therefore, theism is probably true, 
ceteris paribus.

There are plenty of points at which one could still object to this argument, but it seems to me that most objections are philosophically more costly than the conclusion. One might also just accept the conclusion but deny that, in fact, things really are equal (i.e., cetera non sunt pariba) in this case. For instance, the objector could insist that there are no propositions which are ‘necessary’ in the sense required here (that is, necessary simpliciter – not a merely model-dependent necessity). They might also insist, for some odd reason, that there are not possible worlds without contingent minds, or that those worlds are possible in a merely model-dependent way while other possible worlds are possible simpliciter. That would be pretty wild. Another might argue that the existence of a metaphysically necessary immaterial mind doesn’t raise the conditional probability of theism at all (maybe because the probability of theism is ‘0’ – or because it is ‘1’). Somebody could, of course, deny the major premise, that there are laws of logic. Somebody may also insist that laws of logic are not identical to the propositions which express them (though that seems to reify them so much as to put the objector, for other reasons, in the near occasion of belief in theism anyway). Alternatively one may think that each premise on its own seems more plausibly true than false, but that the collection of them together seems to have a upper-bounded probability of lower than or equal to 0.5, and that would be a principled way to object.

Edit*: it occurs to me that there’s no way of which I’m aware to really set an upper-bound on the probability of a conclusion. What the objector could say, then, is either that the conclusion just seems to be no more likely than 0.5 (notwithstanding the plausibility of the individual premises), or that the premises collectively set a lower-bounded probability on the conclusion of less than or equal to 0.5, in which case the argument fails to be compelling.

To be fair, this argument of mine very likely draws significantly from the influence of James N. Anderson and Greg Welty,2 whose argument seems, to me, much better than what often passes for responsible argument among presuppositionalists (among whom, I should take a moment to clarify, I adamantly do not count myself).

1 For those interested, you can find the audio of the debate, and the transcript (because the audio is really not great) at the following two links: https://youtu.be/ZLZdOGCE5KQ?t=34s and http://www.brianauten.com/Apologetics/apol_bahnsen_stein_debate_transcript.pdf

2 James N. Anderson and Greg Welty, “The Lord of Non-Contradiction: An Argument for God from Logic” Philosophia Christi 13:2 (2011). http://www.proginosko.com/docs/The_Lord_of_Non-Contradiction.pdf

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